Skeet & Trap

Trap shooting – Learn to shoot moving clay targets in Aspen

Let’s shoot clay targets in Aspen! Most people who’ve had any experience shooting moving clay targets think they’ve shot “skeet” or “trap.” But really these are the names of two different types of actual games in shooting sports – similar in the way we refer to a game of chess or checkers. Skeet is a more advanced game than trap as explained below. 

Aspen Shooting’s certified instructors are here to introduce beginners to these shooting sport games of skeet and trap and also assist experienced shooters in advancing their skill set. When you visit Aspen try a different outdoor activity to enjoy beautiful Colorado and shoot clay targets with us!

A little background on Trap Shooting

The game of trap shooting was originally developed for bird hunters to practice their skills. Instead of shooting live pigeons, the use of clay targets was introduced, hence the term “clay pigeons.” Typically, trapshooting is shot using a 12 gauge shotgun. No allowance is given when using smaller gauge firearms (e.g., 16, 20, 28 gauge) although they can be used as well. The number of targets which are launched simultaneously from either a mechanical trap house or hand thrown is either single or double.

Since the 18th century trap shooting has been a well established sport in England and by the 1830’s made its way to the United States, perhaps beginning in Ohio at the Sportsman’s Club of Cincinnati. Back then, live pigeons were used as targets, released from under hats.

Shooting clay targets with a shotgun is technically and fundamentally different from rifle or pistol shooting. Pistol and rifle shootings uses one projectile while taking time to aim and shoot usually at a stationary target. Trap shooting is different as it utilizes hundreds of pellets at once from a shot shell, not a bullet. And the firearm is considered to be pointing at the target (rather than aiming) that is quickly thrown downrange with little time to sight the moving target. 

                  

Skeet shooting – advanced game to shoot clay targets in Aspen

Aspen Shooting’s instructors make an exciting outdoor excursion at the skeet field. Here we play a more advanced game than trap, but still work on target shooting skills while having fun.

Skeet shooting is recreational but also a competitive activity where participants use shotguns to attempt to break moving clay targets which are mechanically thrown from two fixed stations at high speed from a variety of angles. Designed to simulate the experience of bird hunting shooters may practice their technique year round.

The Game of Skeet Explained

There are seven positions the shooter takes on a semicircle with a radius of 21 yards (19 m), and an eighth position halfway between stations 1 and 7. Two houses, a high and low, hold “trap” devices that launch the targets, at each corner of the semicircle to a point 15 feet above ground and 18 feet outside of station 8. One trap launches targets from 10 feet above the ground (“high” house) and the other launches it from 3 feet above ground (“low” house).

At stations 1 and 2 the shooter shoots at single targets launched from the high house and then the low house, then shoots a double where the two targets are launched simultaneously but shooting the high house target first. Next at stations 3, 4, and 5 the shooter shoots at single targets launched from the high house and then the low house. Then at stations 6 and 7 the shooter shoots at single targets launched from the high house and then the low house, then shoots a double, shooting the low house target first then the high house target. Finally, at station 8 the shooter shoots one high target and one low target.

The shooter must then re-shoot his first missed target or, if no targets are missed, must shoot his 25th shell at the low house station 8. This 25th shot was once referred to as the shooter’s option, as he was able to take it where he preferred. Now, to speed up rounds in competition, the shooter must shoot the low 8 twice for a perfect score.

SAFETY IS EVERYONE’S RESPONSIBILITY

FUNDAMENTAL RULES OF SAFE FIREARM HANDLING

  • ALWAYS KEEP GUNS POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION.
  • ALWAYS KEEP GUNS UNLOADED UNTIL READY TO SHOOT.
  • ALWAYS KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOU ARE READY TO SHOOT.
  • ALWAYS KNOW YOUR TARGET, AND WHAT IS BEYOND AND SURROUNDING IT.

GENERAL RULES ON THE RANGE

  • GUN ACTIONS/BREACHES WILL REMAIN OPEN AT ALL TIMES WHEN HANDLED.
  • DO NOT LOAD UNTIL YOU ARE IN/ON YOU’RE SHOOTING STATION.
  • RE-OPEN ACTIONS IMMEDIATELY BEFORE LEAVING A STATION.
  • NEVER GO ONTO THE FIELDS; NEVER PASS THE SKEET OR TRAP HOUSES.
  • NEVER SHOOT UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL.
  • SHOOTERS MUST WEAR EYE AND EAR PROTECTION.The

Play Skeet, Trap & 5 Stand from your computer!

When your local range is closed, you can still practice your clay target shooting right from your PC with our shooting sports simulation game on Steam – CHECK IT OUT